Can Fitness Tracker Biometrics Spot HOCM?

MyoKardia, a San Francisco biotech company currently in clinical trials on a HCM drug called Mavacamten, has come up with a way to spot HOCM simply by using a wristband fitness monitor. The wristband works through the use of optical biosensors which monitor arterial pulse waves.  

During MyoKardia’s trials, the bracelet biosensors were used on HOCM patients and non-affected controls.  The algorithm was able to distinguish HOCM patients from unaffected individuals more than 95% of the time, suggesting that a non-invasive way to screen for HOCM may not be too far in the future.

The linked article at Medgadget contains an interview with MyoKardia’s Dr. Robert McDowell, MyoKardia’s Chief Scientific Officer, and Dr. Eric Green, MyoKardia’s Senior Director of Translational Research with more on the happenings at MyoKardia.

 

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE INTERNATIONAL HCM SUMMIT, PART IV

Editor’s Note:  This is the 4th of 4 blog entries which summarizes the presentations given at the recent International HCM Summit VI in Boston.  The presenter and their hospital affiliation are noted below, along with the topic of their presentation.  When possible, you may access the presenters’ slides via hyperlink by clicking on the name. (Note that not all presenters made their slides available).

To see Part I of this series of highlights from the HCM Summit VI, click here, to see Part II of this series click here, and to see part III of this series. click here.

Continue reading “HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE INTERNATIONAL HCM SUMMIT, PART IV”

Encouraging Results for MyoKardia HCM Drug

MyoKardia’s stock prices jumped today after their recent Stage II trial of the experimental drug mavacamten (formally known as MYK-461)  demonstrated a statistically significant reduction to left ventricular outflow tract gradients as well as improvement to aerobic capacity in patients with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.  

Of the 10 patients who completed the study, 8 saw their gradient reduced to normal levels after 12 weeks on the drug.  The study also showed improvements in both peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2) and New York Heart Association classifications:  7 patients moved up one NYHA class while 2 patients improved by two classes.

The drug seemed to have mild to moderate side effects, though one patient was forced to drop out of the trial due to a recurrence of atrial fibrillation which necessitated discontinuation of mavacamten and a return to anti-arrythmic drugs which had been discontinued due to participation in the trial.

MyoKardia hopes to enroll between 200 and 250 patients in its next phase trial (Explorer HCM) which it plans to begin before the end of 2017.

MyoKardia also plans a clinical trial of mavacamten in non-obstructive HCM patients in the second half of 2017.

For more information on MyoKardia and  recent drugs being developed for HCM read these past blog entries:

MyoKardia HCM Drug Has Success in Cats

End of the Road for Eleclazine and Liberty HCM Study

HCM Drug Trial Advances to Next Round

Drug for Non-Obstructive HCM Moves Along