The Future of HCM Care

Dr. Stephen Heitner, together with his colleagues at Oregon Health & Sciences University, published an article last week in the European Journal of Heart Failure which gives a glimpse into the treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) in the future.  Although recent publications have stated that the majority of HCM patients today have a favorable prognosis when receiving appropriate treatment, a heavy disease burden continues to be placed upon patients.  Hence, better and more effective treatments for HCM are still needed in order to lessen this burden.

The article provides a very thorough overview of both current and future HCM therapies and divides them into a few different categories listed below.

Drugs:

  • Potential for New Drugs:  No drugs have been specifically approved for the treatment of HCM by the Federal Drug Administration. Up until now, all drugs used to treat HCM patients (with the limited exception of propanolol) have been off-label uses.  However, this is likely to soon change. Current trials of myosin modulators like MyoKardia’s mavacamten and Cytokinetic’s CK-274 have so far yielded promising results and have the potential to change the treatment paradigm for HCM.

 

Arrhythmia Management:

 

  • Subcutaneous ICDs (S-ICDs) are sometimes a reasonable choice for preventing sudden cardiac death in HCM patients when pacing is not required. This allows the patient to avoid risks associated with lead malfunction.

Septal Reduction Therapy:

 

Gene Editing and Silencing:

  • Pre-implantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD):  Current medical technology allows patients with known HCM gene(s) to use pre-implantation genetic diagnosis of embryos together with in-vitro fertilization in order to avoid passing along the HCM gene to the embryo.  The future may soon see these methods being used in tandem with gene repair, using CRISPR/Cas9 in order to edit out the errant gene and replace it with a normal one.

 

  • Gene Silencing:  Allele specific gene silencing may also prove to be a technique used in the future for preventing HCM. This technique involves the introduction of an adenovirus containing a short RNA segment designed to turn off the HCM gene.

 

In conclusion, this paper highlights the many things that HCM patients have to be optimistic about going forward.  Perhaps one day soon one of these methods will lead to the ultimate goal – a cure!

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE INTERNATIONAL HCM SUMMIT VI, PART II

**Because so much HCM information was presented at the Summit, this is the second of multiple blog entries.  Stay tuned to HCMBeat for more highlights from the HCM Summit.  To see Part I of this series of highlights from the HCM Summit VI, click here.**

The 6th International HCM Summit was held October 27, 28 and 29th in Boston, Massachusetts.  This symposium brings together HCM professionals from around the world who are there to learn about and discuss the latest developments in the treatment of HCM.

The symposium was organized by long time HCM expert Dr. Barry Maron and his son, Dr. Martin Maron.  Both Marons are now affiliated with Tufts Medical Center’s Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Center.

What follows are summaries from selected talks presented at the meeting.  The presenter and their hospital affiliation are noted below, along with the topic of their presentation.  When possible, you may access the presenters’ slides via hyperlink by clicking on the name. (Note that not all presenters made their slides available).

Continue reading “HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE INTERNATIONAL HCM SUMMIT VI, PART II”